The Teaching Program in a Psychiatric Setting: Its Implications for Patients, Trainees and Staff.

  • R Lindenfield
  • Published 1965 in Canadian Medical Association journal

Abstract

Today, with increasing emphasis on teaching programs, members of the teaching faculty are prone to lose sight of the implications of such programs for the patients, the trainees and the staff. But the effects, for good or ill, are there. For example, what does it mean to a patient to be interviewed in front of a group of students? What effect does the frequent turnover of trainess have on patients? Trainees, for their part, have a desire to succeed, but simultaneously they experience the frustration born of lack of knowledge. They want to help, but how? Staff not only carry a responsibility to teach; they must also evaluate. Indeed for each group there are special problems and for each group special compensations. Only as teaching staffs recognize these special problems-and these special compensations-can they discharge their responsibilities in a way that does justice to education in the truest sense of the word.

Cite this paper

@article{Lindenfield1965TheTP, title={The Teaching Program in a Psychiatric Setting: Its Implications for Patients, Trainees and Staff.}, author={R Lindenfield}, journal={Canadian Medical Association journal}, year={1965}, volume={92}, pages={752-5} }