The TFOS International Workshop on Contact Lens Discomfort: report of the subcommittee on epidemiology.

@article{Dumbleton2013TheTI,
  title={The TFOS International Workshop on Contact Lens Discomfort: report of the subcommittee on epidemiology.},
  author={Kathy Dumbleton and Barbara E. Caffery and Murat Doğru and Sheila B. Hickson-Curran and Jami R. Kern and Takashi Kojima and Philip B. Morgan and Christine Purslow and Danielle M. Robertson and John Daniel Nelson},
  journal={Investigative ophthalmology \& visual science},
  year={2013},
  volume={54 11},
  pages={
          TFOS20-36
        }
}
This report characterizes the neurobiology of the ocular surface and highlights relevant mechanisms that may underpin contact lens-related discomfort. While there is limited evidence for the mechanisms involved in contact lens-related discomfort, neurobiological mechanisms in dry eye disease, the inflammatory pathway, the effect of hyperosmolarity on ocular surface nociceptors, and subsequent sensory processing of ocular pain and discomfort have been at least partly elucidated and are presented… 

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