The Sweet Taste of Success

@article{Hagger2013TheST,
  title={The Sweet Taste of Success},
  author={Martin S. Hagger and Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2013},
  volume={39},
  pages={28 - 42}
}
According to the resource-depletion model, self-control is a limited resource that is depleted after a period of exertion. Evidence consistent with this model indicates that self-control relies on glucose metabolism and glucose supplementation to depleted individuals replenishes self-control resources. In five experiments, we tested an alternative hypothesis that glucose in the oral cavity counteracts the deleterious effects of self-control depletion. We predicted a glucose mouth rinse, as… Expand
No effects of ingesting or rinsing sucrose on depleted self-control performance
TLDR
A metabolic account of self-control was not supported, and a positive effect of rinsing on depleted self- control performance was demonstrated, this was independent of energetic content. Expand
Sweet delusion. Glucose drinks fail to counteract ego depletion
TLDR
No effect of sugar sensing or ingestion on ego depletion could be detected and this findings add to previous challenges of the glucose model of self-control and highlight the need for independent replications. Expand
After a pair of self-control-intensive tasks, sucrose swishing improves subsequent working memory performance
TLDR
Claims that self-control failure is caused by the depletion of a resource (or that it functions as if it relies on a limited resource) merit greater circumspection, as well as contrary to predictions from the limited strength model. Expand
Testing the role of glucose in self-control: A meta-analysis
TLDR
A meta-analysis provided clear and consistent evidence against the glucose view of self-control such that none of the three corollaries was supported. Expand
Resource forecasting: Differential effects of glucose taste and ingestion on delay discounting and self-control
TLDR
The behavioral and neuroimaging findings together suggest a dual signaling role of glucose sensation and ingestion in regulating delay discounting and self-control, suggesting that glucose ingestion eases the process of making intertemporal choice. Expand
The sweetness of surrender: Glucose enhances self-control by signaling environmental richness
Abstract According to the ego-depletion account of loss of self-control, self-control is, or depends on, a depletable resource. Advocates of this account have argued that what is depleted is actuallyExpand
Understanding and Overcoming Self‐control Depletion
After people exert self-control, self-control performance on subsequent tasks tends to suffer, as if the capacity for self-control was depleted by the prior exertion. The present paper discussesExpand
The Effects of Self-Control on Glucose Utilization in a Hyperinsulinemic Euglycemic Glucose Clamp
TLDR
The glucose hypothesis of self-control posits that acts ofSelf-control may draw upon glucose as a source of energy, leading to a decrease in blood glucose levels after exertion, which is related to fasting glucose levels. Expand
Self-regulatory depletion in dogs: Insulin release is not necessary for the replenishment of persistence
TLDR
Results indicate that insulin release is probably not necessary for the replenishment that is presumed to be responsible for the increase in persistence, and energy transfer is not necessary, although insulin secretion may be involved. Expand
Illusionary delusions. Willingness to exercise self-control can mask effects of glucose on self-control performance in experimental paradigms that use identical self-control tasks
TLDR
Researchers who test the glucose hypothesis in the context of a depletion paradigm should employ dissimilar acts of self- control and ensure that depleted participants are sufficiently motivated to exercise self-control. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 53 REFERENCES
Self-control relies on glucose as a limited energy source: willpower is more than a metaphor.
TLDR
It is suggested that self-control relies on glucose as a limited energy source, and a single act of self- Control causes glucose to drop below optimal levels, thereby impairing subsequent attempts at self- control. Expand
Mechanisms of Self-Control Failure: Motivation and Limited Resources
TLDR
It is suggested that depletion only affects performance on tasks that require self-control; tasks that are difficult but do not requireSelf-control are immune to the effects of depletion; depleted individuals may compensate for their lack of self- control resources when sufficiently motivated. Expand
Moderation of Resource Depletion in the Self-Control Strength Model: Differing Effects of Two Modes of Self-Control
TLDR
The differential effects of good and poor control support a two-mode model of self-control and suggest associations between good self- control and behavior may be due, in part, to goodSelf-control reducing the effects ofself-control demands on behavior. Expand
Does the Brain Consume Additional Glucose during Self-Control Tasks?
  • R. Kurzban
  • Engineering, Medicine
  • Evolutionary psychology : an international journal of evolutionary approaches to psychology and behavior
  • 2010
TLDR
From the standpoint of evolved function, glucose might better be thought of as an input to decision making systems rather than as a constraint on performance. Expand
Ego Depletion—Is It All in Your Head?
TLDR
The findings suggest that reduced self-control after a depleting task or during demanding periods may reflect people’s beliefs about the availability of willpower rather than true resource depletion. Expand
The Role of Glucose in Self-Control
  • C. Beedie, A. Lane
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Personality and social psychology review : an official journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc
  • 2012
TLDR
It is argued here that the brain has both sufficient resources and resource delivery mechanisms with which to support self-control but that these resources are allocated in accordance with personal priorities. Expand
After Depletion: The Replenishment of the Self's Regulatory Resources
Two experiments investigated how people replenish the self's limited regulatory resource after it is depleted by self-control exertion. Specifically, in Experiment 1, when depleted participantsExpand
Ego depletion and the strength model of self-control: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
Support for motivation and fatigue as alternative explanations for ego depletion indicate a need to integrate the strength model with other theories and provide preliminary support for the ego-depletion effect and strength model hypotheses. Expand
Toward a Physiology of Dual-Process Reasoning and Judgment: Lemonade, Willpower, and Expensive Rule-Based Analysis
TLDR
This experiment used the attraction effect to test the hypothesis that ingestion of sugar can reduce reliance on intuitive, heuristic-based decision making and found that the effect increases when people have depleted their mental resources performing a previous self-control task. Expand
Self-control as limited resource: regulatory depletion patterns.
TLDR
A strength model of self-regulation fits the data better than activation, priming, skill, or constant capacity models ofSelf-regulation. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...