The Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting by Matsigenka Native Communities in Manu National Park, Peru

@article{OhlSchacherer2007TheSO,
  title={The Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting by Matsigenka Native Communities in Manu National Park, Peru},
  author={Julia Ohl-Schacherer and Glenn H. Shepard and Hillard S. Kaplan and Carlos Augusto Peres and Taal Levi and Douglas W. Yu},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={21}
}
Abstract:  The presence of indigenous people in tropical parks has fueled a debate over whether people in parks are conservation allies or direct threats to biodiversity. A well‐known example is the Matsigenka (or Machiguenga) population residing in Manu National Park in Peruvian Amazonia. Because the exploitation of wild meat (or bushmeat), especially large vertebrates, represents the most significant internal threat to biodiversity in Manu, we analyzed 1 year of participatory monitoring of… 

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