The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England, c. 1400-c. 1580.

@article{Duffy1993TheSO,
  title={The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England, c. 1400-c. 1580.},
  author={Eamon Duffy},
  journal={The Eighteenth Century},
  year={1993},
  volume={24},
  pages={224}
}
  • E. Duffy
  • Published 1993
  • History
  • The Eighteenth Century
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