The Story of the Earth According to Paul: Romans 8:18–23

@article{Bauckham2011TheSO,
  title={The Story of the Earth According to Paul: Romans 8:18–23},
  author={Richard J. Bauckham},
  journal={Review \& Expositor},
  year={2011},
  volume={108},
  pages={91 - 97}
}
  • R. Bauckham
  • Published 1 February 2011
  • Sociology
  • Review & Expositor
* Richard Bauckham was until recently Professor of New Testament Studies and Bishop Wardlaw Professor in the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and is now Professor Emeritus at St. Andrews. He retired in 2007 in order to concentrate on research and writing, and is Senior Scholar at Ridley Hall, Cambridge, and is also a Visiting Professor at St. Mellitus College, London. Romans 8:19-23 has been described as “an environmental mantra,”1 meaning that appeal is often made to it as a kind of… 
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This thesis utilizes a methodology developed from contemporary philosophical and cognitive approaches to metaphor theory to present a reading of the four ui`oqesi,a metaphors in Romans and Galatians
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References

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Romans 8.19–22 and Isaiah's Cosmic Covenant
There are striking thematic and verbal parallels between Isaiah 24–27 and Rom 8.18–30 that suggest that Isaiah 24–27 provides the primary source for Paul's description of the ruin and groaning of
AN ENVIRONMENTAL MANTRA? ECOLOGICAL INTEREST IN ROMANS 8:19-23 AND A MODEST PROPOSAL FOR ITS NARRATIVE INTERPRETATION
Romans 8:19-23 has become a favourite text for ecotheologians seeking biblical grounds for promoting a positive approach towards non-human creation. However, there has been little work that both
I am especially indebted to the following studies: Laurie J. Braaten
  • HBT
  • 2006
In the Greek the subject of "waits" is "the eager longing of the creation
The "groaning" is probably not the cries of a woman in labor but a distinct reference to the mourning of creation, while "in travail" does not imply a positive outcome
These are the domestic animals, distinguished from the wild animals in v