The Status of the World's Land and Marine Mammals: Diversity, Threat, and Knowledge

@article{Schipper2008TheSO,
  title={The Status of the World's Land and Marine Mammals: Diversity, Threat, and Knowledge},
  author={Jan Schipper and Janice S. Chanson and Federica Chiozza and Neil A Cox and Michael Hoffmann and Vineet Katariya and John F. Lamoreux and Ana S. L. Rodrigues and Simon N. Stuart and Helen J. Temple and J. E. M. Baillie and Luigi Boitani and Thomas E. Lacher and Russell A. Mittermeier and Andrew T. Smith and Daniel Absolon and John M. Aguiar and Giovanni Amori and Noura Bakkour and Ricardo Baldi and Richard J. Berridge and Jon Bielby and Patricia Ann Black and Julian Blanc and Thomas M. Brooks and James A. Burton and Thomas M Butynski and Gianluca Catullo and Roselle E. Chapman and Zoe Cokeliss and Ben Collen and J. W. H. Conroy and Justin G. Cooke and Gustavo A B da Fonseca and Andrew E. Derocher and Holly T. Dublin and John W. Duckworth and Louise. Emmons and Richard Emslie and Marco Festa‐Bianchet and Matt Foster and Sabrina Nicole Foster and David L. Garshelis and Cormack C. Gates and Mariano Gimenez-Dixon and Susana Gonz{\'a}lez and Jos{\'e} F. Gonz{\'a}lez-Maya and Tatjana C. Good and Geoffrey A. Hammerson and Philip S. Hammond and D. C. D. Happold and Meredith Happold and J. N. Hare and Richard B. Harris and Clare E. Hawkins and Mandy Haywood and Lawrence R Heaney and Simon Hedges and Kristofer M. Helgen and Craig Hilton‐Taylor and Syed Ainul Hussain and Nobuo Ishii and Thomas A Jefferson and Richard K. B. Jenkins and Charlotte Johnston and Mark Keith and Jonathan Kingdon and David Knox and Kit M. Kovacs and Penny F. Langhammer and Kristin Leus and Rebecca L. Lewison and Gabriela Lichtenstein and Lloyd F. Lowry and Zoe Macavoy and Georgina M. Mace and David P. Mallon and Monica Masi and Meghan W. McKnight and Rodrigo A. Medell{\'i}n and Patr{\'i}cia Medici and Gus Mills and Patricia D. Moehlman and Sanjay Molur and Arturo Mora and Kristin Nowell and John F Oates and Wanda Olech and William L. R. Oliver and Monik Oprea and Bruce D. Patterson and William Perrin and Beth A. Polidoro and Caroline M. Pollock and Abigail Powel and Yelizaveta Protas and Paul A. Racey and Jim Ragle and Pavithra Ramani and Galen B. Rathbun and Randall R. Reeves and Stephen B. Reilly and John Elliott Reynolds and Carlo Rondinini and Ruth Grace Rosell-Ambal and Monica Rulli and Anthony B. Rylands and Simona Savini and Cody Schank and Wes Sechrest and Caryn Self-Sullivan and Alan H. Shoemaker and Claudio Sillero-Zubiri and Naamal De Silva and David E. Smith and Chelmala Srinivasulu and P. J. Stephenson and Nico van Strien and Bibhab Kumar Talukdar and Barbara L. Taylor and Robert J. Timmins and Diego G. Tirira and Marcelo F. Tognelli and Katerina Tsytsulina and L. M. Wallace R.B. Martinez J. Veiga and J. Christophe Vi{\'e} and Elizabeth A. Williamson and Sarah A. Wyatt and Yan Xie and Bruce E. Young},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={322},
  pages={225 - 230}
}
Knowledge of mammalian diversity is still surprisingly disparate, both regionally and taxonomically. [] Key Result Data, compiled by 1700+ experts, cover all 5487 species, including marine mammals. Global macroecological patterns are very different for land and marine species but suggest common mechanisms driving diversity and endemism across systems.
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