The State of Sustainable Research Software: Results from the Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE5.1)

@article{Katz2019TheSO,
  title={The State of Sustainable Research Software: Results from the Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE5.1)},
  author={Daniel S. Katz and Stephan Druskat and Robert Haines and Caroline Jay and Alexander Struck},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2019},
  volume={abs/1807.07387}
}
This paper uses the accepted submissions from the Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE5.1) held in Manchester, UK in September 2017 and the speed blogs written during the event to examine the state of research software. It presents a schematic of the space, then examines coverage in terms of topics, actors, actees, and themes by both the submissions and the blogs. 

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