The Stab-in-the-Back Legend and the Vietnam War

@article{Kimball1988TheSL,
  title={The Stab-in-the-Back Legend and the Vietnam War},
  author={Jeffrey Prentiss Kimball},
  journal={Armed Forces \& Society},
  year={1988},
  volume={14},
  pages={433 - 458}
}
  • J. Kimball
  • Published 1 April 1988
  • Political Science
  • Armed Forces & Society
Although associated with post-World War I Germany, the stab-in-the-back perspective is a common cultural response to defeat in war. An American, post-Vietnam War version maintains that the military could have won the war but for the activities of Democratic presidents, Congress, civilian strategists, the press, and antiwar protesters. The roots of the legend lie in arch-conservative assumptions, partisanship, wartime right-wing criticism of Lyndon Johnson's war, militant cold war attitudes, and… 
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