The Speech of Negroes in Colonial America

@article{Read1939TheSO,
  title={The Speech of Negroes in Colonial America},
  author={A. W. Read},
  journal={The Journal of Negro History},
  year={1939},
  volume={24},
  pages={247 - 258}
}
  • A. W. Read
  • Published 1939
  • Sociology
  • The Journal of Negro History
The speech of the past is lost forever unless it has been captured by some mechanical means. The records of Negro speech are to be found chiefly in dialect fiction, much of it fantastically inaccurate; but for the eighteenth century even this source is for the most part lacking. An incident in Boston in 1721 furnished the occasion for the first attempt to record the speech of American Negroes. During the heated dispute about inoculation against small-pox, Cotton Mather, wvho favored it… Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-8 OF 8 REFERENCES
Almost invariably the Negroes who speak "broken" or "bad" or "indifferent" English are noted as being foreignborn: Run away
    John, says he was born in France . . . speaks quick and broken.42 Run away from the Subscriber . . . a tall black Negro Man named JACK, about 35 Years of Age . . . speaks plain for an African born
    • speaks broken English, and is said to be a Bumbar Negro.40 Ran away from the Subscriber . . . a new Negroe Fellow
    Run away from my plantation, a NEGRO MAN named Bob
      Stolen by three white men, off Mrs. Pinckney's island, near
        a large strong made Negro Fellow named PHIL. Country born, about thirty five Years of Age, and talks pretty good English
          has lost some of his Upper fore-Teeth, this Country born, Sensible, and speaks English very well
            how high these standards were or whether they varied in different parts of Georgia Gazette
              speaks very good English. He says he was born in Vir