Corpus ID: 6048892

The Spatial Ecology of War and Peace

@inproceedings{Guo2016TheSE,
  title={The Spatial Ecology of War and Peace},
  author={Weisi Guo and Xueke Lu and Guillem Mosquera Donate and Samuel R Johnson},
  year={2016}
}
  • Weisi Guo, Xueke Lu, +1 author Samuel R Johnson
  • Published 2016
  • Sociology, Computer Science, Physics
  • Human flourishing is often severely limited by persistent violence. Quantitative conflict research has found common temporal and other statistical patterns in warfare, but very little is understood about its general spatial patterns. While the importance of topology in geostrategy has long been recognised, the role of spatial patterns of cities in determining a region's vulnerability to conflict has gone unexplored. Here, we show that global patterns in war and peace are closely related to the… CONTINUE READING

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