The Southern-Most Ivy: Princeton University from Jim Crow Admissions to Anti-Apartheid Protests, 1794–1969

@article{Bradley2010TheSI,
  title={The Southern-Most Ivy: Princeton University from Jim Crow Admissions to Anti-Apartheid Protests, 1794–1969},
  author={Stefan M. Bradley},
  journal={American Studies},
  year={2010},
  volume={51},
  pages={109 - 130}
}
  • S. Bradley
  • Published 11 April 2013
  • Political Science
  • American Studies
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Bradley, S. M. (2010). The southern-most Ivy: Princeton University from Jim Crow admissions to anti-apartheid protests, 1764–1969. American Studies, 51(3/4), 109–130. Karabel, J. (2005). The chosen:

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