The Slave Trade and British Capital Formation in the Eighteenth Century: A Comment on the Williams Thesis

@article{Engerman1972TheST,
  title={The Slave Trade and British Capital Formation in the Eighteenth Century: A Comment on the Williams Thesis},
  author={Stanley L. Engerman},
  journal={Business History Review},
  year={1972},
  volume={46},
  pages={430 - 443}
}
  • S. Engerman
  • Published 1 December 1972
  • Economics, History
  • Business History Review
Professor Engerman constructs estimates of relevant data in order to test the assertion that profits from the slave trade provided the capital which financed the Industrial Revolution in England. 
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