The Skeletal Phenotype of “Negritos” from the Andaman Islands and Philippines Relative to Global Variation among Hunter-Gatherers

@inproceedings{Stock2013TheSP,
  title={The Skeletal Phenotype of “Negritos” from the Andaman Islands and Philippines Relative to Global Variation among Hunter-Gatherers},
  author={Jay T. Stock},
  booktitle={Human biology},
  year={2013}
}
  • J. Stock
  • Published in Human biology 4 December 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
Abstract The “negrito hypothesis” suggests that populations of smallbodied foragers in South and Southeast Asia who share common phenotypic characteristics may also share a common, ancient origin. The key defining characteristics of the “negrito” phenotype, small body size, dark skin, and tightly curled hair, have been interpreted as linking these populations to sub-Saharan Africans. The underlying assumption of this interpretation is that the observed phenotypic similarities likely reflect… 
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The results indicate that the Malbri do not directly descend from the indigenous negritos, and likely have a recent origin by an extreme founder event from an agricultural group, most likely the Htin or a closely- related group.
Contrasting maternal and paternal genetic variation of hunter-gatherer groups in Thailand
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The results indicate that the Malbri do not directly descend from the indigenous negritos, and likely have a recent origin by an extreme founder event from an agricultural group, most likely the Htin or a closely-related group.
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TLDR
The data indicate that the Andamanese have closer affinities to Asian than to African populations and suggest that they are the descendants of the early Palaeolithic colonizers of Southeast Asia.
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It is proposed that the early/mid-Holocene dispersal of the B4a1a mitochondrial DNA clade across Borneo, the Philippines, and Taiwan may be important for understanding the distinction between Philippine and other negritos.
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TLDR
The genetic evidence from genome-wide autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is reviewed for a shared history between the tribes of Little Andaman (Onge) and Great Andaman, and between these two groups and the rest of South and Southeast Asia (both negrito and non-negrito groups).
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Abstract The aboriginal tribal groups living in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are thought to be the descendants of people who were part of the early human dispersal into the Southeast Asia.
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  • J. Stock
  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2006
TLDR
Investigating variation in robusticity in claviculae, humeri, ulnae, femora, and tibiae among human foragers, relative to climate and habitual behavior suggests that there may be a stronger relationship between observed patterns of diaphyseal hypertrophy and behavioral differences between populations in distal elements.
Stature, Mortality, and Life History among Indigenous Populations of the Andaman Islands, 1871–1986
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