The Singular Quest for a Universal Tree of Life

@article{Sapp2013TheSQ,
  title={The Singular Quest for a Universal Tree of Life},
  author={J. Sapp and G. Fox},
  journal={Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={77},
  pages={541 - 550}
}
  • J. Sapp, G. Fox
  • Published 2013
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews
SUMMARY Carl Woese developed a unique research program, based on rRNA, for discerning bacterial relationships and constructing a universal tree of life. Woese's interest in the evolution of the genetic code led to him to investigate the deep roots of evolution, develop the concept of the progenote, and conceive of the Archaea. In so doing, he and his colleagues at the University of Illinois in Urbana revolutionized microbiology and brought the classification of microbes into an evolutionary… Expand
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