The Settlement of the Americas: A Comparison of the Linguistic, Dental, and Genetic Evidence [and Comments and Reply]

@article{Greenberg1986TheSO,
  title={The Settlement of the Americas: A Comparison of the Linguistic, Dental, and Genetic Evidence [and Comments and Reply]},
  author={Joseph Harold Greenberg and Christy G. Ii Turner and Stephen L. Zegura and Lyle Campbell and James Alan Fox and William S. Laughlin and Kenneth M Weiss and Ellen Woolford},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={1986},
  volume={27},
  pages={477 - 497}
}
The classification of the indigenous languages of the Americas by Greenberg distinguishes three stocks, Amerind, Na-Dene, and Aleut-Eskimo. The first of these covers almost all of the New World. The second consists of Na-Dene as defined by Sapir and, outside of recent. Athapaskan extensions in California and the American Southwest, is found in southern Alaska and northwestern Canada. The third, Aleut-Eskimo, is the easternmost branch of the Eurasiatic language family located in northern Asia… 
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