The Seascale cluster: a probable explanation

@article{Doll1999TheSC,
  title={The Seascale cluster: a probable explanation},
  author={Richard Doll},
  journal={British Journal of Cancer},
  year={1999},
  volume={81},
  pages={3 - 5}
}
  • R. Doll
  • Published 1 September 1999
  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Cancer
Seldom, if ever, can so few cases of disease have caused so much work and so much public concern for such a long time as the seven cases of leukaemia that occurred in young people under 25 years of age who lived in Seascale during the period 1955Ð1983. The expected number cannot be calculated precisely, but the excess under 10 years of age was about tenfold (five against 0.5 expected) and there can be no doubt that this ÔSeascale clusterÕ, as it has come to be called, constitutes a most unusual… Expand
Childhood leukaemia clusters around Sellafield and Dounreay
In 1983, a television programme identified a striking cluster of childhood leukaemia in the coastal village of Seascale, adjacent to the Sellafield nuclear complex in England. Excesses of childhoodExpand
Childhood leukaemia and ordnance factories in west Cumbria during the Second World War
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  • Medicine
  • Dose-response : a publication of International Hormesis Society
  • 2014
TLDR
The most likely explanation for the clusters is ‘population mixing’, i.e., the influx of outside workers to rural regions where nuclear installations are being set up and where local people are not immune to pathogens brought along with the incomers. Expand
An ecological investigation of the incidence of cancer in Welsh children for the period 1985–1994 in relation to residence near the coastline
An alarming report from an environmental pressure group raised concerns about childhood leukaemia and the Irish Sea. In response, this ecological study explores the hypotheses that childhood cancerExpand
Epidemiological studies of leukaemia in children and young adults around nuclear facilities: a critical review.
TLDR
A review of the related epidemiological literature confirms that some clusters of childhood leukaemia cases exist locally, however, results based on multi-site studies around nuclear installations do not indicate an increased risk globally. Expand
Population mixing and the geographical epidemiology of childhood leukaemia and type 1 diabetes in New Zealand
TLDR
The majority of the findings were suggestive of an infectious aetiology for both diseases, and higher incidence of both diseases was observed in areas which increased the most in population mixing over short time periods (6/7 years). Expand
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