The Scientific Status of Unconscious Processes: Is Freud Really Dead?

@article{Westen1999TheSS,
  title={The Scientific Status of Unconscious Processes: Is Freud Really Dead?},
  author={Drew Westen},
  journal={Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association},
  year={1999},
  volume={47},
  pages={1061 - 1106}
}
  • D. Westen
  • Published 1 August 1999
  • Psychology
  • Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
At regular intervals for over half a century, critiques of Freud and psychoanalysis have emerged in the popular media and in intellectual circles, usually declaring that Freud has died some new and agonizing death, and that the enterprise he created should be buried along with him like the artifacts in the tomb of an Egyptian king. Although the critiques take many forms, a central claim has long been that unconscious processes, like other psychoanalytic constructs, lack any basis in scientific… 

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