The Scent of Genetic Compatibility : Sexual Selection and the Major Histocompatibility Complex

@inproceedings{Penn2002TheSO,
  title={The Scent of Genetic Compatibility : Sexual Selection and the Major Histocompatibility Complex},
  author={Dustin J. Penn},
  year={2002}
}
Individuals in some species prefer mates carrying dissimilar genes at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which may function to increase the MHC or overall heterozygosity of progeny. Here I review the evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences from recent studies, including studies on the underlying olfactory mechanisms and evolutionary functions. Many studies indicate that MHC genes in ̄uence odour, and some work is beginning to examine the potential role of MHC-linked olfactory… CONTINUE READING
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