The Saffron Scourge: A History of Yellow Fever in Louisiana, 1796-1905

@inproceedings{Carrigan1994TheSS,
  title={The Saffron Scourge: A History of Yellow Fever in Louisiana, 1796-1905},
  author={Jo Ann Carrigan},
  year={1994}
}
The history of American medicine and public health is a relatively new field of endeavor for the academic historian; countless areas remain thus far almost complete­ ly unexplored. The subject of epidemic disease and its impact, for example, deserves a more thorough investigation and consideration as a significant aspect of social and intellectual history. Representing an essay into that particular area, this dissertation involves a study of yellow fever in Louisiana from the first recorded… 
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