The SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts – II. New FRB discoveries and their follow-up.

@article{Bhandari2017TheSF,
  title={The SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts – II. New FRB discoveries and their follow-up.},
  author={Shivani Bhandari and Evan F. Keane and Ewan D. Barr and Andrew Jameson and Emily Petroff and Simon Johnston and Matthew Bailes and N. D. Ramesh Bhat and Marta Burgay and Sarah Burke-Spolaor and Manisha Caleb and Ralph P. Eatough and Chris Flynn and J. A. Green and Fabian Jankowski and Michael Kramer and Vivek Venkatraman Krishnan and V Morello and Andrea Possenti and B.Stappers and Caterina Tiburzi and Willem van Straten and Igor Andreoni and T. Butterley and Poonam Chandra and Jeffrey Cooke and A.Corongiu and D. M. Coward and Vik S. Dhillon and Richard Dodson and Liam K Hardy and E J Howell and Phrudth Jaroenjittichai and Alain Klotz and Stuart P. Littlefair and Thomas R. Marsh and Mitchell Mickaliger and T. W. B. Muxlow and D. Perrodin and Tyler Pritchard and Utane Sawangwit and Tsuyoshi Terai and Nozomu Tominaga and Pablo Torne and Tomonori Totani and Alessio Trois and D.Turpin and Yuu Niino and R. W. Wilson and The Antares Collaboration},
  journal={Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
  year={2017},
  volume={475},
  pages={1427-1446}
}
We report the discovery of four Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in the ongoing SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts at the Parkes Radio Telescope: FRBs 150610, 151206, 151230 and 160102. Our real-time discoveries have enabled us to conduct extensive, rapid multimessenger follow-up at 12 major facilities sensitive to radio, optical, X-ray, gamma-ray photons and neutrinos on time-scales ranging from an hour to a few months post-burst. No counterparts to the FRBs were found and we provide… 

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