The Roman Grain Supply, 442–455

@article{Linn2012TheRG,
  title={The Roman Grain Supply, 442–455},
  author={Jason Linn},
  journal={Journal of Late Antiquity},
  year={2012},
  volume={5},
  pages={298 - 321}
}
  • Jason Linn
  • Published 2012
  • History
  • Journal of Late Antiquity
The Vandal occupation of North Africa has been seen as the deathblow to the western empire because of the Vandals’ ensuing control over the Roman grain supply. This study, however, suggests that Rome did not suff er from frequent food crises between 442 and 455. Adducing Vandal taxation policy, numismatic evidence, archaeological land surveys, and precipitation data from modern Tunisia, it furthermore contends that the Vandals were in fact sending grain to Rome during this time, even if in… Expand
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