• Corpus ID: 12032487

The Role of a Step-Down Unit in Improving Patient Outcomes

@inproceedings{Chan2014TheRO,
  title={The Role of a Step-Down Unit in Improving Patient Outcomes},
  author={Carri W. Chan},
  year={2014}
}
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Critical care in hospitals : When to introduce a Step Down Unit ?

A queueing model of patient flow through the ICU and SDU in order to determine when an SDU is needed and what size it should be is proposed and it is found that under some circumstances the optimal size of theSDU is zero, while in other cases, having a sizable SDU m ay be beneficial.

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