The Role of Segmentation in Phonological Processing: An fMRI Investigation

@article{Burton2000TheRO,
  title={The Role of Segmentation in Phonological Processing: An fMRI Investigation},
  author={Martha W. Burton and Steven L. Small and Sheila E. Blumstein},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2000},
  volume={12},
  pages={679-690}
}
Phonological processes map sound information onto higher levels of language processing and provide the mechanisms by which verbal information can be temporarily stored in working memory. Despite a strong convergence of data suggesting both left lateralization and distributed encoding in the anterior and posterior perisylvian language areas, the nature and brain encoding of phonological subprocesses remain ambiguous. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRT) to… 
An fMRI Investigation of Speech and Tone Segmentation
TLDR
The results suggest that a significant portion of active frontal areas is recruited for extracting acoustic information and maintaining it in memory for decision, however, some regions at the border of the inferior/middle frontal gyrus may be unique to speech segmentation.
Phonological manipulation between speech perception and production activates a parieto-frontal circuit
TLDR
It is proposed that these parieto-frontal regions are recruited when the task requires phonological manipulation over and above the more automated transfer of auditory into articulatory verbal codes, which appears to involve area Spt.
Phonemic manipulation in Japanese: an fMRI study.
TLDR
The posterior parts of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) were active during the auditory tasks, suggesting that phonological representations of auditory stimuli are manipulated in this area, and the intraparietal sulci, which has been implicated for visuospatial tasks, wasactive during the visual tasks.
The role of inferior frontal cortex in phonological processing
  • M. Burton
  • Psychology, Computer Science
    Cogn. Sci.
  • 2001
TLDR
Reanalysis of evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests that there are functional subregions within the inferior frontal gyrus that correspond to specific components of phonological processing (e.g., orthographic to phonological conversion in reading, and segmentation in speech).
Imaging phonology without print: Assessing the neural correlates of phonemic awareness using fMRI
TLDR
A task to evaluate phonological processing that used visual stimuli but did not require interpretation of orthographic forms suggested that phonologicalprocessing that is not mediated by print relies primarily on frontal language processing areas among skilled readers.
Processing of sub-syllabic speech units in the posterior temporal lobe: An fMRI study
TLDR
It seems reasonable to assume that the MTG/STS activation represents phonetic/phonological processing, which may involve the processing of both spectral and temporal features considered important for phonetic encoding.
A systematic investigation of the functional neuroanatomy of auditory and visual phonological processing
TLDR
This study provides a systematic comparison of phonological tasks across modalities, with patterns of activation corresponding to the cognitive demands of performing phonological judgments on spoken and written stimuli.
A Cross-Linguistic fMRI Study of Spectral and Temporal Cues Underlying Phonological Processing
TLDR
It appears that lower level specialization for acoustic cues in the spectral and temporal domains cannot be generalized to abstract higher order levels of phonological processing, indicating that hemispheric specialization is sensitive to language-specific factors.
Phonological processing in speech perception: What do sonority differences tell us?
TLDR
The sensitivity of phonological brain areas depends on the modality of stimulus presentation and task demands; the only region sensitive to phonological complexity was the posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus, with the complexity effect only present for print.
Phonological Grammar Shapes the Auditory Cortex: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study
TLDR
In a cross-linguistic design using French and Japanese participants and a fast event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm, it is shown that phonological grammar involves the left superior temporal and the left anterior supramarginal gyri, two regions previously associated with the processing of human vocal sounds.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 49 REFERENCES
PET studies of phonetic processing of speech: review, replication, and reanalysis.
TLDR
The findings support a model whereby articulatory processes involving a portion of Broca's area are important when phonetic segments must be extracted and manipulated, whereas left posterior temporal cortex is involved in perceptual analysis of speech.
The anatomy of phonological and semantic processing in normal subjects.
TLDR
Brain activation was assessed in the temporal, parietal and frontal multi-modal association areas that constitute parts of a large network that represent the specific anatomic substrate of the lexico-semantic processing of language.
A multimodal language region in the ventral visual pathway
TLDR
These findings agree with the proposal that BA37 is an association area that integrates converging inputs from many regions, and confirm a prediction of theories of brain function that depend on convergence zones.
PET Studies of Auditory and Phonological Processing: Effects of Stimulus Characteristics and Task Demands
TLDR
Results demonstrate that focusing more closely on basic neural processing differences (such as temporal integration rates) may lead to a better understanding of the specific neural processes that underlie complex phonological tasks.
A PET study of cognitive strategies in normal subjects during language tasks. Influence of phonetic ambiguity and sequence processing on phoneme monitoring.
TLDR
Activation of Broca's area in the sequential and ambiguous task reproduces the previous result and suggests that subjects resorted to a predominantly verbal rehearsal strategy when performing this task.
Cerebral organization of component processes in reading.
TLDR
The cerebral organization of word identification processes in reading was examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a strategy of multiple subtractions was employed in order to validate relationships between structure and function.
Hearing and saying. The functional neuro-anatomy of auditory word processing.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that Broca's area is involved in both auditory word perception and repetition but activation is dependent on task (Greater during repetition than hearing) and stimulus presentation (greater when hearing words at a slow rate).
Is developmental dyslexia a disconnection syndrome? Evidence from PET scanning.
TLDR
The independent activation of the posterior and anterior speech areas in dyslexics supports the notion that representations of unsegmented and segmented phonology are functionally and anatomically separate.
The neural correlates of the verbal component of working memory
TLDR
Comparisons of distribution of cerebral blood flow in these conditions localized the phonological store to the left supramarginal gyrus whereas the subvocal rehearsal system was associated with Broca's area, the first demonstration of the normal anatomy of the components of the 'articulatory loop'.
Sex differences in the functional organization of the brain for language
TLDR
The data provide clear evidence for a sex difference in the functional organization of the brain for language and indicate that these variations exist at the level of phonological processing.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...