The Role of Numeracy in Understanding the Benefit of Screening Mammography

@article{Schwartz1997TheRO,
  title={The Role of Numeracy in Understanding the Benefit of Screening Mammography},
  author={Lisa M. Schwartz and Steven Woloshin and William Black and H Gilbert Welch},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={1997},
  volume={127},
  pages={966-972}
}
Patients are increasingly being exposed to quantitative information about risks for disease and benefits of treatment. Many authors [1-6] believe that the use of such information is an important component of informed decision making; others claim that only patients given such information can make truly informed choices. This position is reflected in the recent decision of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Panel not to make a recommendation about screening mammography for women aged 40… 
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