The Role of Godly Magistrates in the Church: Melanchthon as Luther's Interpreter and Collaborator

@article{Estes1998TheRO,
  title={The Role of Godly Magistrates in the Church: Melanchthon as Luther's Interpreter and Collaborator},
  author={James Martin Estes},
  journal={Church History},
  year={1998},
  volume={67},
  pages={463 - 483}
}
  • J. Estes
  • Published 1 September 1998
  • Philosophy
  • Church History
Our knowledge of Melanchthon's thought on the role of godly magistrates in the church is surprisingly incomplete, despite the generally acknowledged importance of that thought. Most Reformation scholars are familiar with Melanchthon's argument that the Christian magistrate is, as custodian of both tables of the Law and as foremost member of the church, the incumbent of an office established for the sake of the church and thus burdened with responsibility for the establishment and maintenance of… 
9 Citations

‘Because thy God loves England’: Bishop John Jewel and the Catholicity of the Church of England, 1535-1599

John Jewel (Bishop of Salisbury 1559-1571) became the champion of the Church of England mere months after the formation of the Elizabethan religious settlement. He preached a sermon at Paul’s Cross

Philip Melanchthon’s Early Theology of Preaching: Theologizing the Word of God in His Apology of the Augsburg Confession (1531)

This paper focuses on how Philip Melanchthon organized his theology of preaching in the Apology of the Augsburg Confession, the very first defense of the early church reformers’ approach to doctrine

Martin Luther on the Legitimacy of Resisting the Emperor

  • J. Raley
  • History
    Journal of Law and Religion
  • 2022
Abstract Martin Luther (1483–1546) repeatedly addressed the question of whether political resistance might be directed lawfully against sovereign rulers if they acted tyrannically in light of the

Cura Religionis or Two Kingdoms: The Late Luther on Religion and the State in the Lectures on Genesis1

In 1996, Bernhard Lohse wondered if the Luther presented by some would recognize the Luther described by others. Trying to recognize the “political” Luther would be especially difficult. On the one

Blind injustice : Jesus' prophetic warning against unjust judging (Matt 7:1-5)

This dissertation seeks to provide a plausible alternative to the consensus interpretation of Jesus‘ ―do not judge‖ teaching in Matt 7:1-5. While the overwhelming majority of recent interpreters

Philip Melanchthon's Influence on the English Theological Thought During the Early English Reformation

......................................................................................................................................... iii Acknowledgments

References

SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES