The Role of Flower Width in Hummingbird Bill Length‐Flower Length Relationships 1

@article{Temeles2002TheRO,
  title={The Role of Flower Width in Hummingbird Bill Length‐Flower Length Relationships 1},
  author={Ethan J. Temeles and Yan. B. Linhart and Michael C. Masonjones and Heather D Masonjones},
  journal={Biotropica},
  year={2002},
  volume={34}
}
Observations of hummingbirds feeding at flowers longer or shorter than their bills seem to contradict the view that bill lengths of hummingbirds evolved in concert with the lengths of their flowers. [] Key Method We predicted that both short- and long-billed hummingbirds would include long, wide flower species in their diets, but that short-billed hummingbirds would not include long, narrow flower species because nectar in these species might be beyond the reach of their bills.
Effect of flower shape and size on foraging performance and trade-offs in a tropical hummingbird.
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RESTRICTION OF POLLINATOR ASSEMBLAGE THROUGH FLOWER LENGTH AND WIDTH IN THREE LONG-TONGUED HAWKMOTH–POLLINATED SPECIES OF MANDEVILLA (APOCYNACEAE, APOCYNOIDEAE)1
TLDR
It is tested how the corolla tube length and operative width required for effective release of the pollination mechanism could restrict the pollinator assemblage in putatively hawkmoth-pollinated Apocynaceae that differ in flower depth.
Hummingbird responses to gender-biased nectar production: are nectar biases maintained by natural or sexual selection?
  • J. E. Carlson
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2008
TLDR
Sexual selection, more so than geitonogamy avoidance, maintains nectar biases in C. friedrichsthaliana, in one of the clearest examples of sexual selection in plants, to date.
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