The Role of Exposure to Media Violence in the Etiology of Violent Behavior

@article{Savage2008TheRO,
  title={The Role of Exposure to Media Violence in the Etiology of Violent Behavior},
  author={Joanne Savage},
  journal={American Behavioral Scientist},
  year={2008},
  volume={51},
  pages={1123 - 1136}
}
  • J. Savage
  • Published 1 April 2008
  • Law, Psychology, Political Science
  • American Behavioral Scientist
Criminologists have been conspicuously absent from the debate about media violence and aggression. In this article, the author attempts to fill this void by discussing the relationship between exposure to television and film violence and violent behavior in the context of the empirical and theoretical literature on violent crime. Some criticisms of the literature on media violence are offered. The disjuncture between the absence of media violence in the criminological literature and the… 

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