The Role of Collagen in the Aorta's Structure

@article{Berillis2013TheRO,
  title={The Role of Collagen in the Aorta's Structure},
  author={Panagiotis Berillis},
  journal={The Open Circulation \& Vascular Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={6},
  pages={1-8}
}
  • P. Berillis
  • Published 1 February 2013
  • Medicine
  • The Open Circulation & Vascular Journal
Aorta is the largest artery in the body. Anatomically, it is traditionally divided into the ascending, the aortic arch, the descending, the thoracic and the abdominal aorta. Collagen is one of the most important components of the aortic wall. Its concentration and its total amount play a significant role in the aortas' function and mechanical properties, such as tensile strength and stiffness. The two main types of collagen found in the aorta are types I and III and they account for 80-90% of… 
Histological regional analysis of the aortic root and thoracic ascending aorta: a complete analysis of aneurysms from root to arch
TLDR
The aortic root differs histologically from the ascending aorta confirming its unique composition in aneurysm pathology, and should prompt further evaluation on the influence of this altered structure on function which could potentially guide clinical management.
The role of transglutaminases in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms
TLDR
It has been shown that both FXIII-A and TG2 are involved in the maintenance of basal vessel integrity and that aortic permeability is increased in mice lacking FX III-A, and that TG2 and/or FXII-A are not essential for vascular calcification.
The estimation of age from elastic fibers in the tunica media of the aortic wall in a thai population: a preliminary study using aorta image analysis
TLDR
Changes in the percentage density of elastic fibers in the tunica media of the aortic wall can be used to add information to age estimation for identification purposes.
The review of selected biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm
TLDR
The biomarkers presented in the paper are not limited to AAA, and thus can be used only for visual assessment of the degree of abdominal aortic aneurysm development.
Inflammatory and Connective Tissue Disorders of the Aorta
TLDR
This chapter serves as a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and available medical and surgical treatments for aortic disease in each of these unique patient populations.
Local properties and rupture characteristics of thoracic aortic aneurysm tissue
TLDR
A combined experimental and computational method was developed and employed to characterize wall stress, strain, and property distributions in harvested ATAA samples to a sub-millimeter resolution and it was found that the tissue fractures preferentially in the direction of the highest stiffness, generating orifices that are locally transverse to the aorta.
Extracellular matrix in ascending aortic aneurysms and dissections – What we learn from decellularization and scanning electron microscopy
TLDR
Contact of aneurysmal and dissected tissue with the alkaline decellularization solution revealed potential disease related changes in ECM quality which can partly be connected to already published data, but have to be proven by further studies.
The susceptibility of the aortic root: porcine aortic rupture testing under cardiopulmonary bypass
TLDR
This unique porcine model shows that the aortic root is most susceptible to failure at high continuous aorta pressures, supported histologically by different changes in collagen content and subtypes in the aORTic root.
Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.
TLDR
The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure.
Multiscale Mechanical Behavior of Large Arteries
TLDR
A vast literature survey on how the mechanical properties of arteries are related to structural features is proposed, evidencing, for the first time, the strong correlation existing between elastin and collagen contents within the arterial wall.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 75 REFERENCES
Age-Dependent Changes of Collagen and Elastin Content in Human Aorta and Pulmonary Artery
TLDR
This paper seems to be the first report of simultaneous estimation of collagen and elastin content of both the aorta and the pulmonary artery.
Collagen in abdominal aortic aneurysm: typing, content, and degradation.
TLDR
It is suggested that only limited collagen turnover occurs in the media of abdominal aortic aneurysms before rupture, and abnormalities in type III collagen may be one of the genetic factors contributing to familial clustering of aneurYSms.
[Type I and III procollagen in patients with abdominal aorta aneurysms].
TLDR
Evidence was provided of an enhanced metabolism of collagen type III in the AAA wal with predominant degradation in growing and symptomatic AAA and of the importance of PICP and PIIINP plasma levels.
Collagen is reduced and disrupted in human aneurysms and dissections of ascending aorta.
TLDR
Aortic dissections and aneurysms show a decrease in collagen content that could be related to a weakness of the wall underlying the diseases, but the locations of the decrease differ: in dissections, it is situated mostly at the external portion of the media (site of cleavage), whereas in aneurYSms, it was more diffuse, consistent with the global enlargement.
Interstitial collagens and ageing in human aorta
TLDR
Histologically the elastic tissue is more altered in the lower abdominal section of aorta than in the arch, and with ageing collagen type III decrease in quantity from the heart to the distal portion of the aortA.
Growth hormone influences the content and composition of collagen in the aorta from old rats
TLDR
Although the diameter and the collagen content were increased, the mechanical properties of the aorta were preserved in the GH-injected rats, suggesting that GH induced a substantial growth of old rats.
The role of type I collagen in aortic wall strength with a homotrimeric.
TLDR
The presence of homotrimeric type I collagen isotype (absence of alpha2(I) collagen) significantly weakens the aorta and may help to elucidate the role of collagen in the development of aneurysmal aortic disease or dissection.
Localization of collagen types in regional segments of the fetal bovine aorta.
  • P. Howard, E. Macarak
  • Medicine
    Laboratory investigation; a journal of technical methods and pathology
  • 1989
Types I, III, and IV collagens were localized immunocytochemically in muscular and small arteries of fetal bovine tissues and in different regional segments of the aorta. The distribution of these
Localization of collagen types in regional segments of the fetal bovine aorta.
Types I, III, and IV collagens were localized immunocytochemically in muscular and small arteries of fetal bovine tissues and in different regional segments of the aorta. The distribution of these
Viscoelasticity of the vessel wall: the role of collagen and elastic fibers.
TLDR
It is hypothesized that changes in the interface between collagen fibrils, elastic fibers, and smooth muscle during aging and in connective tissue disorders leads toChanges in the viscoelasticity of the vessel wall.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...