The Role of Cannabinoids in Regulation of Nausea and Vomiting, and Visceral Pain

@article{Malik2015TheRO,
  title={The Role of Cannabinoids in Regulation of Nausea and Vomiting, and Visceral Pain},
  author={Zubair Malik and Daniel Jinhag Baik and Ron Schey},
  journal={Current Gastroenterology Reports},
  year={2015},
  volume={17},
  pages={1-9}
}
Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric… 
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