The River Discontinuum: Applying Beaver Modifications to Baseline Conditions for Restoration of Forested Headwaters

@inproceedings{Burchsted2010TheRD,
  title={The River Discontinuum: Applying Beaver Modifications to Baseline Conditions for Restoration of Forested Headwaters},
  author={Denise Burchsted and Melinda D. Daniels and Robert M. Thorson and Jason C. Vokoun},
  year={2010}
}
Billions of dollars are being spent in the United States to restore rivers to a desired, yet often unknown, reference condition. In lieu of a known reference, practitioners typically assume the paradigm of a connected watercourse. Geological and ecological processes, however, create patchy and discontinuous fluvial systems. One of these processes, dam building by North American beavers (Castor canadensis), generated discontinuities throughout precolonial river systems of northern North America… 
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