The Risks and Weaknesses of the International Criminal Court from America's Perspective

@article{Bolton2001TheRA,
  title={The Risks and Weaknesses of the International Criminal Court from America's Perspective},
  author={J. Bolton},
  journal={Law and contemporary problems},
  year={2001},
  volume={64},
  pages={167-180}
}
  • J. Bolton
  • Published 2001
  • Sociology
  • Law and contemporary problems
JOHN R. BOLTON [*] In the aftermaths of both World War I and World War II, the United States engaged in significant domestic political debates over its proper place in the world. President Wilson's brainchild, the League of Nations, was the centerpiece of the first debate, and the United Nations the centerpiece of the second. The conventional wisdom is that the dark forces of isolationism defeated Wilson's League in the Senate, and that the advent of the Cold War gridlocked the nascent United… Expand
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