The Rise and Fall of the Carbonaria Form of the Peppered Moth

@article{Cook2003TheRA,
  title={The Rise and Fall of the Carbonaria Form of the Peppered Moth},
  author={Laurence Martin Cook},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={78},
  pages={399 - 417}
}
  • L. Cook
  • Published 2003
  • Geography, Medicine
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
The evidence for change in frequency of the melanic carbonaria morph in the peppered moth Biston betularia (L.) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in England and Wales is reviewed. At mid‐20th century a steep cline of melanic phenotype frequency running from the north of Wales to the southern coast of England separated a region of 5% or less to west from 90% or more to northeast. By the 1980s the plateau of 90% frequency had contracted to northern England. The frequency has since continued to drop so… Expand
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