The Rise and Fall of Pellagra in the American South

@article{Clay2017TheRA,
  title={The Rise and Fall of Pellagra in the American South},
  author={Karen Clay and Ethan Schmick and Werner Troesken},
  journal={Econometric Modeling: Agriculture},
  year={2017}
}
We explore the rise and fall of pellagra, a disease caused by inadequate niacin consumption, in the American South, focusing on the first half of the twentieth century. We first consider the hypothesis that the South’s monoculture in cotton undermined nutrition by displacing local food production. Consistent with this hypothesis, a difference-in-differences estimation shows that after the arrival of the boll weevil, food production in affected counties rose while cotton production and pellagra… 
The Rise and Fall of Pellagra in the American South
Focusing on the first half of the twentieth century, we explore the rise and fall of pellagra (a disease caused by inadequate niacin consumption) in the American South. We first consider the
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