The Reverse Racism Effect Are Cops More Hesitant to Shoot Black Than White Suspects ?

@inproceedings{James2016TheRR,
  title={The Reverse Racism Effect Are Cops More Hesitant to Shoot Black Than White Suspects ?},
  author={Lois James and StephenM},
  year={2016}
}
Research Summary Race-related debates often assume that implicit racial bias will result in racially biased decisions to shoot. Previous research has examined racial bias in police decisions by pressing “shoot” or “don’t-shoot” buttons in response to pictures of armed and unarmed suspects. As a result of its lack of external validity, however, this methodology provides limited insight into officer behavior in the field. In response, we conducted the first series of experimental research studies… CONTINUE READING

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