The Relative and Perceived Impact of Irrelevant Speech, Vocal Music and Non-vocal Music on Working Memory

@article{Alley2008TheRA,
  title={The Relative and Perceived Impact of Irrelevant Speech, Vocal Music and Non-vocal Music on Working Memory},
  author={T. Alley and Marcie E. Greene},
  journal={Current Psychology},
  year={2008},
  volume={27},
  pages={277-289}
}
  • T. Alley, Marcie E. Greene
  • Published 2008
  • Psychology
  • Current Psychology
  • The ability to retain and manipulate information for brief periods of time is crucial for proficient cognitive functioning but working memory (WM) is susceptible to disruption by irrelevant speech. Music may also be detrimental, but its impact on WM is not clear. This study assessed the effects of vocal music, equivalent instrumental music, and irrelevant speech on WM in order to clarify what aspect of music affects performance and the degree of impairment. To study this, 60 college students… CONTINUE READING
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