The Relationship Between Workplace Stressors and Mortality and Health Costs in the United States

@article{Goh2016TheRB,
  title={The Relationship Between Workplace Stressors and Mortality and Health Costs in the United States},
  author={Joel Goh and Jeffrey Pfeffer and Stefanos A. Zenios},
  journal={Manag. Sci.},
  year={2016},
  volume={62},
  pages={608-628}
}
Even though epidemiological evidence links specific workplace stressors to health outcomes, the aggregate contribution of these factors to overall mortality and health spending in the United States is not known. In this paper, we build a model to estimate the excess mortality and incremental health expenditures associated with exposure to the following 10 workplace stressors: unemployment, lack of health insurance, exposure to shift work, long working hours, job insecurity, work–family conflict… 

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