The Regulation of Skin Pigmentation*

@article{Yamaguchi2007TheRO,
  title={The Regulation of Skin Pigmentation*},
  author={Yuji Yamaguchi and Michaela Brenner and Vincent J. Hearing},
  journal={Journal of Biological Chemistry},
  year={2007},
  volume={282},
  pages={27557 - 27561}
}
Visible pigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes depends primarily on the functions of melanocytes, a very minor population of cells that specialize in the synthesis and distribution of the pigmented biopolymer melanin. Melanocytes are derived from precursor cells (called melanoblasts) during embryological development, and melanoblasts destined for the skin originate from the neural crest. The accurate migration, distribution, and functioning of melanoblasts/melanocytes determine the visible… Expand
Update on the regulation of mammalian melanocyte function and skin pigmentation.
TLDR
A number of new factors that are involved in that regulation have recently been reported, such as factors that regulate melanosome pH and ion transport, which are important to the biochemistry of pigment synthesis and the biogenesis of melanosomes. Expand
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[Principles of skin pigmentation. Biochemistry and regulation of melanogenesis].
  • M. Brenner, C. Berking
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift fur Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete
  • 2010
TLDR
Understanding the intrinsic mechanisms of melanogenesis is the basis for modifications of skin pigmentation which are of great interest pharmaceutically and cosmeceutically. Expand
Genetics of pigmentation in skin cancer--a review.
TLDR
The genetic variants within the genes involved in pigmentation besides influencing phenotypic traits are important determinants of risk of several skin cancers, however, ultimate risk of skin cancer is dependent on interplay between genetic and host factors. Expand
Biochemical aspects of mammalian melanocytes and the emerging role of melanocyte stem cells in dermatological therapies
TLDR
The fundamental aspects of melanocytes/melanin biology taken together the underlying cause of pigmentary disorders are discussed and an insight into the melanocyte stem cells biology is given, which can facilitate the development of novel treatment regimens for dermatological disorders. Expand
Classical and Nonclassical Melanocytes in Vertebrates
Melanogenic cells produce melanin, a polymer based on tyrosine, in specialized organelles, the melanosomes. This synthesis is catalyzed by an enzyme that converts tyrosine into dopaquinone,Expand
Signaling Pathways in Melanogenesis
TLDR
The regulatory mechanisms involved in melanogenesis are discussed and how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate melanin production are explained, as well as the regulatory roles of different proteins involved in pigment molecules that are endogenously synthesized by melanocytes. Expand
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