The Regeneration of Fraxinus Excelsior in Woods with a Field Layer of Mercurialis Perennis

@article{Wardle1959TheRO,
  title={The Regeneration of Fraxinus Excelsior in Woods with a Field Layer of Mercurialis Perennis},
  author={Peter Wardle},
  journal={Journal of Ecology},
  year={1959},
  volume={47},
  pages={483}
}
  • P. Wardle
  • Published 1 July 1959
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of Ecology
Fraxinus excelsior ranges almost throughout lowland Britain, occupying soils with a surface pH greater than about 4'2. In woodland communities it is accompanied by Mercurialis perennis, except on sites which are exposed and dry, and on sites which are subject to periodic waterlogging. In the present paper, attention is focused on the regeneration of Fraxinus in woods where Mercurialis is clearly dominant in the field layer; for here is provided a straightforward example of the relationship… 

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The genus Fraxinuts contains several species of woody plants of economic importance. The majority of these are propagated from seed in nature and under cultivation. Very little specific information

Diseases of Trees

Lilacs and spiraeas treated to the warm bath about mid-November flowered before Christmas, and azaleas early in January; while untreated plants, under the same conditions, had at this time hardly started their buds.