The Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER) scale: development and validation of a stroke recognition instrument

@article{Nor2005TheRO,
  title={The Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER) scale: development and validation of a stroke recognition instrument},
  author={Azlisham Mohd Nor and John Davis and Bas Sen and Dean Shipsey and Stephen J. Louw and Alexander G. Dyker and Michelle L. Davis and Gary A. Ford},
  journal={The Lancet Neurology},
  year={2005},
  volume={4},
  pages={727-734}
}
Prospective Evaluation of the Recognition of Stroke In the Emergency Room (ROSIER) Scale in Emergency Department
TLDR
The ROSIER scale was a useful stroke recognition tool for potential stroke patients, but showed no significant superiority over the FAST.
Evaluation of the Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER) Scale in Chinese Patients in Hong Kong
TLDR
The ROSIER scale was not as effective at differentiating acute stroke from stroke mimics in Chinese patients in Hong Kong as it was in the original studies, primarily due to a much lower specificity.
Development of a new stroke scale in an emergency setting
TLDR
GZSS had better sensitivity than existing stroke scales in Chinese patients with suspected stroke and should be conducted to confirm its effectiveness in the initial differentiation of acute stroke from stroke mimics.
Validation of the use of the ROSIER scale in prehospital assessment of stroke
TLDR
The ROSIER is a sensitive and specific stroke recognition tool for health providers’ use among Chinese patients in the prehospital setting, however, it cannot be used to confidently rule out or identify stroke as a diagnosis.
Clinical scores for the identification of stroke and transient ischaemic attack in the emergency department: a cross-sectional study
TLDR
The simpler FAST scale could replace the more complex ROSIER for the initial assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke in the emergency department, and there was no detectable difference between the scales in sensitivity or specificity.
Can the ROSIER scale diagnose patients with stroke accurately in the emergency department?
  • L. Goldstein
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Nature Clinical Practice Cardiovascular Medicine
  • 2006
DESIGN AND INTERVENTION To develop the risk model, Nor and colleagues used data prospectively collected from patients who were older than 18 years and who had been referred from the emergency
The validity of recognition of stroke in the emergency room (ROSIER) scale in the diagnosis of Iranian patients with acute ischemic stroke in the emergency department
TLDR
Although the best cutoff point for ROSIER scale was the same as the original (derivation) study, its sensitivity and specificity were considerably lower than that of the original study.
Validation of the use of the ROSIER stroke recognition instrument in an Irish emergency department: Comment
  • Zhi-xin Wu
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Irish journal of medical science
  • 2009
Dear Editor, We read with interest the article by Jackson and colleagues. on the ROSIER scale as a stroke recognition tool used by the emergency department(ED) staff [1], and wish to make a few
Evolution of Stroke Diagnosis in the Emergency Room – A Prospective Observational Study
TLDR
The uncertainties in interpreting stroke Symptoms and the lack of facilities for treating emergency stroke in nonurban areas may be outweighed by offering access to a specialized neurological emergency room, thus rectifying any misinterpretation of stroke symptoms and shortening in-hospital time windows for treatment.
Validation of the use of the ROSIER stroke recognition instrument in an Irish emergency department
TLDR
The ROSIER is a suitable and useful adjunct in the assessment of stroke patients in Ireland and was associated with increasing length of stay in survivors.
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