The Receptor for the Cytotoxic Ligand TRAIL

@inproceedings{Pan1997TheRF,
  title={The Receptor for the Cytotoxic Ligand TRAIL},
  author={Guohua Pan and Karen O'rourke and Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Reiner L. Gentz and Reinhard Ebner and Jian Ni and Vishva M. Dixit},
  booktitle={Science},
  year={1997}
}
TRAIL (also known as Apo-2L) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family that rapidly induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. The human receptor for TRAIL was found to be an undescribed member of the TNF-receptor family (designated death receptor-4, DR4) that contains a cytoplasmic “death domain” capable of engaging the cell suicide apparatus but not the nuclear factor kappa B pathway in the system studied. Unlike Fas, TNFR-1, and DR3, DR4 could not use FADD… 
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References

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TLDR
Another member of the TNFR family, death receptor 3 (DR3), was identified and was shown to induce both apoptosis and activation of nuclear factor κB, and likely plays a role in regulating lymphocyte homeostasis.
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TLDR
Results suggest that, along with other family members such as Fas/Apo-1 ligand and TNF, Apo-2L may serve as an extracellular signal that triggers programmed cell death.
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TLDR
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Fas ligand (FasL), a cell surface molecule belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family, binds to its receptor Fas, thus inducing apoptosis of Fas-bearing cells. Various cells express Fas, whereas
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