The Reception of Fracastoro's Theory of Contagion: The Seed That Fell among Thorns?

@article{Nutton1990TheRO,
  title={The Reception of Fracastoro's Theory of Contagion: The Seed That Fell among Thorns?},
  author={Vivian Nutton},
  journal={Osiris},
  year={1990},
  volume={6},
  pages={196 - 234}
}
  • V. Nutton
  • Published 1 January 1990
  • Medicine
  • Osiris
JN MANY MODERN HANDBOOKS of medical history, the medical RenaisI sance of the sixteenth century signifies the lighting of the torch of progress after the dark centuries of the Middle Ages. Anatomists and surgeons, the true devotees of experience, at last triumph over the argumentative theoreticians and jargon-ridden physicians. Due prominence is given to the introduction of new drugs from the Americas or from the laboratories of the chemical Paracelsians, but the therapies of the average… 
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Control of Plague
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It has been shown conclusively that Danish liquid vaccine given to schoolchildren aged 14-15j in urban Britain confers substantial protection against tuberculosis, and that this protection lasts for at least five years and probably for six years or more.
On the importance of Thucydides' evidence see, most recently
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For a recent survey of the manuscripts
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Malley's discussion of the production process of the Fabrica and its related epitomes
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60, 190, 223; and Crato, citations in nn. 90, 91. A good example of this hierarchy of causes is given by Guinther, De pestilentia
Another theologian, Origen, talked of a future in which the earth would be shaken by earthquakes and the atmosphere would become pestilential through "taking on a disease-bearing force
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Cf. the complaint of Dudith to Monaw about those who sought to have the "antiquitatis praeiudicium" on their side before accepting any new discovery or therapy
Cf. the obviously metaphorical use of the phrase "seeds of disease" by Trincavelli in his lectures on fevers of ca. 1550, Opera omnia (cit. n. 64), fol. 19v. 137 As noted, rightly
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Control of Plague" (cit. n. 3), Ch. 9; and Preto
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