The Re-Emergence of Conquest: International Law and the Legitimate Use of Force

@article{Mulligan2020TheRO,
  title={The Re-Emergence of Conquest: International Law and the Legitimate Use of Force},
  author={Michael Mulligan},
  journal={Liverpool Law Review},
  year={2020},
  pages={1-21}
}
The re-emergence of the issue of conquest of territory is one of the most contentious debates surrounding contemporary international law. This article investigates certain developments in respect territorial conquests and the reaction of the international community to such acts. There is analysis of the key relationship between conquest and empire and speculates on the possibility that the re-emergence of conquest is further evidence that international society is reverting to a previous… 
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The Re-Emergence of Conquest: International Law and the Legitimate Use of Force

The re-emergence of the issue of conquest of territory is one of the most contentious debates surrounding contemporary international law. This article investigates certain developments in respect

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