The Rate of Morphological Evolution in Mammals from the Standpoint of the Neutral Expectation

@article{Lynch1990TheRO,
  title={The Rate of Morphological Evolution in Mammals from the Standpoint of the Neutral Expectation},
  author={Michael Lynch},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1990},
  volume={136},
  pages={727 - 741}
}
  • M. Lynch
  • Published 1990
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
A comparison of the evolutionary rates of cranial morphology in mammals with the neutral expectation suggests that stabilizing selection is a predominant evolutionary force keeping the long-term diversification of lineages well below its potential. The rate of morphological divergence of almost all lineages, including the great apes, is substantially below the minimum neutral expectation. The divergence of the modern races of man is slightly above the minimum neutral rate but well below the… Expand
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