The Race of Hysteria: "Overcivilization" and the "Savage" Woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obstetrics and Gynecology

@article{Briggs2000TheRO,
  title={The Race of Hysteria: "Overcivilization" and the "Savage" Woman in Late Nineteenth-Century Obstetrics and Gynecology},
  author={L. Briggs},
  journal={American Quarterly},
  year={2000},
  volume={52},
  pages={246 - 273}
}
  • L. Briggs
  • Published 2000
  • History, Medicine
  • American Quarterly
HYSTERIA, WE LEARNED FROM FEMINIST HISTORICAL SCHOLARSHIP IN the 1970s, was never just a disease. It was also the way nineteenthcentury U.S. and European cultures made sense of women's changing roles. Industrialization and urbanization wrought one set of changes, while the women's rights movement brought another. Together, these included higher education for women, their increasing participation in a (rapidly changing) public sphere, paid employment, and declining fertility. These cultural… Expand
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