The RAD9 gene controls the cell cycle response to DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

@article{Weinert1988TheRG,
  title={The RAD9 gene controls the cell cycle response to DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.},
  author={Ted A. Weinert and Leland H. Hartwell},
  journal={Science},
  year={1988},
  volume={241 4863},
  pages={
          317-22
        }
}
Cell division is arrested in many organisms in response to DNA damage. Examinations of the genetic basis for this response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the RAD9 gene product is essential for arrest of cell division induced by DNA damage. Wild-type haploid cells irradiated with x-rays either arrest or delay cell division in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Irradiated G1 and M phase haploid cells arrest irreversibly in G2 and die, whereas irradiated G2 phase haploid cells… Expand
A novel role for the budding yeast RAD9 checkpoint gene in DNA damage‐dependent transcription.
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The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD 9 cell cycle checkpoint gene is required for optimal repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in both G 1 and G 2 / M phases of the cell cycle
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G1 delay is the predominant response to continuous gamma irradiation at a dose that confers no loss of viability but delays cell division and free DNA ends and/or single-stranded DNA are necessary and sufficient to induce a bona fide G1 checkpoint arrest. Expand
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Radiation Checkpoints in Model Systems.
  • A. Carr
  • Medicine
  • International journal of radiation biology
  • 1994
TLDR
Studies of checkpoints in the yeasts may help to define the signal pathways that control cell cycle delay in mammalian cells following irradiation, some of which have been proposed to be deficient in A-T cells. Expand
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