The Puzzling Persistence of Dual Federalism

@inproceedings{Young2012ThePP,
  title={The Puzzling Persistence of Dual Federalism},
  author={Ernest A. Young},
  year={2012}
}
This essay began life as a response to Sotirios Barber’s essay (soon to be a book) entitled “Defending Dual Federalism: A Self-Defeating Act.” Professor Barber’s essay reflects a widespread tendency to associate any judicially-enforceable principle of federalism with the “dual federalism” regime that dominated our jurisprudence from the Founding down to the New Deal. That regime divided the world into separate and exclusive spheres of federal and state regulatory authority, and it tasked courts… 

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