The Public Choice of Public Stadium Financing: Evidence from San Diego Referenda

@article{Johnson2019ThePC,
  title={The Public Choice of Public Stadium Financing: Evidence from San Diego Referenda},
  author={Candon Johnson and Joshua C. Hall},
  journal={Economies},
  year={2019}
}
Local politicians and team owners frequently argue that the public financing of stadiums is important for local economic development. The sports economics literature, however, has largely found that new professional sport facilities do not generate any new net economic activity. We provide context to this literature by exploring the public choice in the public financing of stadiums. In 2016, San Diego had two ballot measures related to the San Diego Chargers. Measure C would allow officials to… Expand

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Editor’s Introduction
Interest in politics and the political process—topics that economists consider to be the purview of the sub-field of study known as public choice—appears to be as high as ever [...]

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