The Public's Increasing Punitiveness and Its Influence on Mass Incarceration in the United States

@inproceedings{Enns2014ThePI,
  title={The Public's Increasing Punitiveness and Its Influence on Mass Incarceration in the United States},
  author={Peter K. Enns},
  year={2014}
}
Following more than 30 years of rising incarceration rates, the United States now imprisons a higher proportion of its population than any country in the world. Building on theories of representation and organized interest group behavior, this article argues that an increasingly punitive public has been a primary reason for this prolific expansion. To test this hypothesis, I generate a new over-time measure of the public's support for being tough on crime. The analysis suggests that… CONTINUE READING

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