The Psychology of Eating Animals

@article{Loughnan2014ThePO,
  title={The Psychology of Eating Animals},
  author={Steve Loughnan and Brock Bastian and Nick Haslam},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={23},
  pages={104 - 108}
}
Most people both eat animals and care about animals. Research has begun to examine the psychological processes that allow people to negotiate this “meat paradox.” To understand the psychology of eating animals, we examine characteristics of the eaters (people), the eaten (animals), and the eating (the behavior). People who value masculinity, enjoy meat and do not see it as a moral issue, and find dominance and inequality acceptable are most likely to consume animals. Perceiving animals as… Expand
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